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Home Study


Current Concepts in Evaluation, Examination and Rehabilitation of the Knee

Current Concepts in Evaluation, Examination and Rehabilitation of the Knee

Current Concepts in Evaluation, Examination and Rehabilitation of the Knee
Editor: Robert C. Manske, PT, DPT, MEd, SCS, ATC, CSCS

You will earn 30 CEUs upon completion of the course.

Chapter 1: Differential Diagnosis
Jason Brumitt, MSPT, SCS, ATC, CSCS

Chapter 2: Regional Interdependence and Patellofemoral Pain
John D. Willson, PT, PhD
Michael P. Reiman, PT, DPT, OCS, SCS, ATC, FAAOMPT, CSCS

Chapter 3: Rehabilitation of Revision ACL Reconstruction
Michael B. Ellman, MD
Michael D. Rosenthal, PT, DSc, SCS, ECS, ATC, CSCS
Geoffrey S. Van Thiel, MD
Seth L. Sherman, MD
Matthew Provencher, MD

Chapter 4: Meniscal Rehabilitation
John T. Cavanaugh, PT, MEd, ATC, SCS

Chapter 5: Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction for Patellar Instability
Robert C. Manske, PT, DPT, MEd, SCS, ATC, CSCS
B.J. Lehecka, DPT
Daniel Prohaska, MD

Chapter 6: Multiple Ligament Knee Injury Rehabilitation
Richard L. Romeyn, MD
George J. Davies, DPT, MEd, PT, SCS, ATC, LAT, CSCS, PES, FAPTA
Jason Jennings, MD, DPT, ATC


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Evidence for Bony, Muscle and Capsular Healing following Sports MSK Injuries: MSK Single Chapter

Evidence for Bony, Muscle and Capsular Healing following Sports MSK Injuries: MSK Single Chapter

Evidence for Bony, Muscle and Capsular Healing following Sports MSK Injuries
Brandon Schmitt, DPT, ATC

$80.00


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Evidence in Sports MSK Rehabilitation

Evidence in Sports MSK Rehabilitation


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Evidence in Sports Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation Home Study Course

Evidence in Sports Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation Home Study Course

EVIDENCE IN SPORTS MUSCULOSKELETAL REHABILITATION
A Sports Physical Therapy Section Home Study course

Editor: 
Robert C. Manske, PT, DPT, MPT, MEd, SCS, ATC, CSCS

July, 2016

This course offers 60 CEU hours upon completion.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1
Translating Evidence in Sports Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation
Jill Thein-Nissenbaum, PT, DSc, SCS, ATC
Associate Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Doctor of Physical Therapy Program
Staff PT, UW Athletics

Mark D. Weber, PT, PhD, SCS, ATC
Professor, University of Mississippi Medical Center

Dan Lorenz, PT, DPT, LAT, CSCS
Director of Physical Therapy, SSOR, Overland Park, Kansas

Chapter 2
Evidence for Bony, Muscle and Capsular Healing following Sports MSK Injuries
Brandon Schmitt, DPT, ATC
PRO Sports Physical Therapy of Westchester, Scarsdale Athletic Training

Michael J. Mullaney
Research Consultant, Nicholas Institute of Sports Medicine & Athletic Trauma, Lenox Hill Hospital NY, NY
Mullaney & Associates Physical Therapy, LLC
Matawan, NJ

Chapter 3
Cervical, Thoracic, Spine and Rib Injuries: Evidence in Sports MSK Rehabilitation
Jason Brumitt, PT, PhD, ATC, CSCS
Assistant Professor George Fox University (Newberg, OR)

Chapter 4
Lumbar Spine, Pelvis and Sacroiliac Injuries: Evidence in Sports Rehabilitation
Barbara J. Hoogenboom PT, EdD, SCS, ATC
Professor and Associate Chair, Department of Physical Therapy, Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, Michigan

Kelcie Severson, BS, DPT
Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, Michigan

Chapter 5
Shoulder Injuries: Evidence in Sports MSK Rehabilitation
Robert A. Williams Jr., PT, DPT
Sports Physical Therapy Fellowship, Champion Sports Medicine, Birmingham, AL

Christopher A. Arrigo, MS, PT, ATC
Physical Therapy, Tampa, FL

Kevin E. Wilk, PT, DPT, FAPTA
Associate Clinical Director, Champion Sports Medicine, Birmingham, AL
Director Rehabilitative Research, American Sports Medicine Institute, Birmingham, AL
Adjunct Associate Clinical Professor, Marquette University, Programs in Physical Therapy

Chapter 6
Elbow Injuries: Evidence in Sports MSK Rehabilitation
Todd S. Ellenbecker, DPT, MS, SCS, OCS, CSCS
Clinic Director and National Director of Clinical Research, Physiotherapy Associates Scottsdale Sports Clinic
Vice President of Medical Services, ATP World Tour
Scottsdale, Arizona

Blair Bundy, DPT, SCS, CSCS
Director of Performance Enhancement, Physiotherapy Associates Scottsdale Sports Clinic
Scottsdale, Arizona

Chapter 7
Wrist and Hand Injuries: Evidence in Sports Rehabilitation
Chris Juneau, PT, SCS, CSCS
Sports Residency Site Coordinator, Ironman Sports Medicine Institute

Russ Paine, PT
Director, Ironman Sports Medicine Institute

Eric Chicas, PT, SCS
Kevin Maloney, PT, SCS
Jaime Aparicio, PT, SCS
Jason Rivers, PTA
Ironman Sports Medicine Institute, Memorial Hermann Health System, Houston, Texas

David Hildreth, MD
Richmond Bone and Joint Clinics
University of Texas Physicians, Houston, Texas

Chapter 8
Hip Injuries: Evidence in Sports Rehabilitation
Lindsay Becker, PT, DPT, SCS, CSCS
Buckeye Performance Golf, Columbus, OH

David Kohlrieser, PT, DPT, OCS, SCS, CSCS
Orthopedic One, Columbus, OH

Michael Voight, PT, DHSc, OCS, SCS, ATC, FAPTA
Belmont University School of Physical Therapy, Nashville, TN

Chapter 9
Knee Injuries: Evidence in Sports Rehabilitation
Robert C. Manske, PT, DPT, MEd, SCS, ATC, CSCS
Professor and Chair, Department of Physical Therapy, Wichita State University
Via Christi Health Orthopedic and Sports Physical Therapy
Wichita, KS

Mark V. Paterno PT, PhD, MBA, SCS
Coordinator of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
Acting Scientific Director, Division of Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy
Associate Professor, Division of Sports Medicine
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Mark Reinking, PT, PhD, SCS, ATC
Dean, School of Physical Therapy, Regis University, Denver, Colorado

Sarah Reinking, PT, DPT, CSCS
Sports Physical Therapy Resident, Division of OT/PT- Sports Medicine and Orthopedics
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center – Sports Medicine Biodynamic Center

Chapter 10
Ankle and Foot Injuries: Evidence in Sports MSK Rehabilitation
Walter L. Jenkins, PT, DHS, LATC, ATC
Professor and Chair, Department of Physical Therapy, College of Allied Health Sciences, East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina

Bryan Heiderscheit, PT, PhD
Professor, Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering
University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin

D. S. Blaise Williams III, PT, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, Director of VCU Run Lab
Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia  

Chapter 11
Evidence for Imaging Sports MSK Rehabilitation
Charles Hazle, PT, PhD
Associate Professor, Division of Physical Therapy, University of Kentucky

Terry R Malone, PT, EdD, ATC, FAPTA
Professor, Division of Physical Therapy, University of Kentucky

Michael D Rosenthal, PT, DSc, SCS, ECS, ATC, CSCS, CAPT, MSC, USN
Naval Medical Center, San Diego, CA

Chapter 12
Alternative Treatments  in MSK Rehabilitation
Phil Page, PT, PhD, ATC, CSCS, FACSM
Director of Research and Education, Performance Health
Baton Rouge, LA

Sue Falsone PT, MS, SCS, ATC, CSCS, COMT, RYT®
Founder, S&F: Structure and Function
Phoenix, AZ

Barton N. Bishop, DPT, SCS, TPI CGFI-MP2, CSCS
Chief Clinical Officer, Sport and Spine Rehab
Rockville, MD


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Imaging for Athletic Injuries and Conditions

Imaging for Athletic Injuries and Conditions

Earn 35 CEUs upon successful completion

Overall Objectives:
Upon completion of this home study course, participants will:
1.     Identify the optimal imaging modality for evaluation of selected musculoskeletal pathology in athletes.
2.     Understand which standard (plain) radiograph view is appropriate for various musculoskeletal pathology.
3.     Understand the limitations of musculoskeletal imaging as related to athletic injuries and pathology.
4.     Demonstrate understanding of clinical decision rules to guide selection of musculoskeletal imaging.
5.     Demonstrate understanding of evidence based guidelines for the selection and recommendation of imaging for musculoskeletal injuries in athletes.

Chapter 1
Diagnostic imaging in sports physical therapy
Michael Ross, PT, DSc, OCS
Upon successful completion of this chapter, the student will be able to
1.  Engage in the diagnostic process, using musculoskeletal imaging procedures, when appropriate, to establish differential diagnoses across systems and across the lifespan.
2.  Determine the most appropriate musculoskeletal imaging procedure according to the patient/client presentation and the current best evidence for diagnosis.
3.  Determine the relevance of visualized pathology to clinical decision-making.
4.  Use evidence-based diagnostic imaging procedures as appropriate to help determine the patient/client who would benefit from rehabilitation and the patient/client who requires referral for medical services.
 
Chapter 2
Imaging for athletic injuries and conditions involving the spine
Jason Brumitt, PT, PhD, ATC, CSCS
 
Upon successful completion of this chapter, the student will be able to
1.  Identify appropriate imaging modalities for optimal assessment of various athletic injuries and pathologic conditions of the spine.
2.  Identify the most appropriate radiology views for optimal assessment of various athletic injuries and pathologic conditions of the spine.
3.  Identify appropriate imaging for the evaluation of adolescent and/or pediatric patients with athletic injuries and pathologic conditions of the spine.
4.  Apply clinical prediction rules for determining when imaging of the spine is essential.
 
Chapter 3
Imaging of the shoulder for the sports physical therapist
Ed Mulligan, PT, DPT, OCS, SCS, ATC
 
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to
1.  Determine the clinical relevance of abnormal imaging findings in the context of the patient’s musculoskeletal history and examination.
2.  Interpret the diagnostic accuracy, reliability, and validity of imaging studies in identifying relevant pathologies of the shoulder.
3.  Determine the most appropriate imaging procedures and views based on the patient’s clinical presentation.
4.  Recognize the appearance of normal anatomy and the common imaging findings associated with glenohumeral instability, rotator cuff dysfunction, labral pathology, osteoarthritis, and humeral fractures.
5.  Utilize imaging information in the prognostic and intervention clinical-decision making process for injuries unique to patients with symptomatic shoulder issues.
6.  Recognize imaging findings that require referral for further medical evaluation.
 
Chapter 4
Imaging for athletic injuries and conditions: elbow, forearm, wrist, and hand
Carrie Hoppes, PT, DPT, NCS, OCS, ATC, CSCS
 
Upon successful completion of this chapter, the student will be able to
1.  Identify appropriate imaging modalities for optimal assessment of various athletic injuries and pathologic conditions of the elbow, forearm, wrist, and hand.
2.  Identify the most appropriate radiology views for optimal assessment of various athletic injuries andpathologic conditions of the elbow, forearm, wrist, and hand.
3.  Identify appropriate imaging for the evaluation of adolescent and/or pediatric patients with athletic injuries and pathologic conditions of the elbow, forearm, wrist, and hand.
4.  Apply clinical prediction rules for determining when imaging of the elbow, forearm, wrist, and hand is essential.

Chapter 5
Imaging of pelvis, hip and thigh injuries in sport
Michael D. Rosenthal, PT, DSc, SCS, ECS, ATC, CSCS
 
Upon successful completion of this chapter, the student will be able to
1.  Interpret the diagnostic accuracy, reliability, and validity of imaging studies in identifying relevant pathologies of the pelvis, hip and thigh.
2.  Determine the most appropriate imaging procedures and views based on the patient’s clinical presentation.
3.  Recognize the appearance of normal anatomy and the common imaging findings associated with hip pathology.
4.  Utilize imaging information in the clinical decisionmaking process for injuries unique to patients with pelvis, hip, and thigh pathology.
 
Chapter 6
Knee imaging in sports medicine
Joseph Miller, PT, DPT, DSc, OCS, SCS, CSCS
 
Upon successful completion of this chapter, the student will be able to
1.  Demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of imaging modalities for the knee aftersports injuries.
2.  Demonstrate an understanding of the indications for imaging and most appropriate modality for the adult knee after sports injuries.
3.  Demonstrate an understanding of the basic interpretation of imaging modalities for the knee after sports injuries.
4.  Demonstrate an understanding of the indications for imaging and most appropriate modality for the pediatric knee after sports injuries.
 
Chapter 7
Imaging of the lower leg, ankle and foot (LLAF) for the sports physical therapist
Jason E. Bennett, PhD, PT, SCS, ATC
 
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to
1.  Evaluate the appropriateness of imaging in the examination of sports injuries involving the LLAF.
2.  Compare the advantages and disadvantages of select imaging modalities in the examination of sports injuries involving the LLAF.
3.  Interpret the results of imaging related to sports injuries involving the LLAF.
4.  Integrate the best available evidence related to imaging results into the evaluation and management of sports injuries involving the LLAF.


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Injury Prevention in Sports Medicine

Injury Prevention in Sports Medicine

INJURY PREVENTION IN SPORTS MEDICINE

Editor: Mike Mullaney, PT

Earn 30 CEUs upon successful completion of the course.

Injury Prevention Home Study Course Objectives

To understand the common injuries associated with today’s athletes and risk factors that may contribute to these injuries.

To understand the research based injury prevention methods available to address soft tissue injuries of the ankle, knee and shoulder.

To understand the physiology associated with muscle injury and recovery.

To understand the equipment options available to prevent head and facial injuries in today’s athletes.

To understand the 4 step model to implementing an injury prevention program.

Chapter 1: The Prevention of Muscle Strains in Sports Medicine

Chapter 2: Recognition, Treatment, and Prevention of Exertional Heat Illness

Chapter 3: Sequence of Prevention: A Systematic Approach to Prevent Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury in Female Athletes

Chapter 4: The Prevention of Ankle Injuries

Chapter 5: Protective Equipment for Prevention of Head and Mouth Injuries

Chapter 6: Prevention of Repetitive Shoulder Injuries in Overhead Athletes


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Knee Injuries: Evidence in Sports Rehabilitation: MSK Single Chapter

Knee Injuries: Evidence in Sports Rehabilitation: MSK Single Chapter

Knee Injuries: Evidence in Sports Rehabilitation

$80.00


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Management of the Golfing Athlete Throughout the Lifespan

Management of the Golfing Athlete Throughout the Lifespan

Management of the Golfing Athlete Throughout the Lifespan

Content Editor:
Lindsay Becker, DPT, SCS, CSCS, CGFI-M3

Managing Editor:
Rob Manske, PT, DPT, MEd, SCS, ATC

30 CEUs

Course Objectives
Understand the musculoskeletal demands of the golf swing and common injuries affecting the golfing athlete.
Describe how physical limitations can cause golf swing inefficiencies.
Describe the components of a comprehensive golf evaluation and work within a team to create a plan of care.
Desribe the components of a golf performance program.
Describe the physiological/musculoskeletal changes affecting the senior golfer.
Understand how to develop a comprehensive junior golf program utilizing the long term athletic development model.

Table of Contents
 
Chapter 1
Golf epidemiology and common injuries
Barton Bishop, DPT, SCS, TPI CGFI-MP2, CSCS
 
Chapter 2
Golf swing efficiency
Greg Rose, DC
Phillip Cheetham, PhD
Michael Voight, PT, DHSc, OCS, SCS, ATC, FAPTA
 
Chapter 3
Evaluation of the golf athlete
Jeffery Banaszak, PT, CSCS
 
Chapter 4
Performance training for the golfer
Lindsay Becker, DPT, SCS, CSCS, CGFI-M3
 
Chapter 5
The senior golfer: special considerations
Jeff Ciolek PT, ATC, COMT, CGFI-3
Kelly Holcomb, PT, MPT, CGFI-2
Brian Stalter, PT, MPT, CGFI-1
 
Chapter 6
Working with the junior golfer
Lindsay Becker, DPT, SCS, CSCS, CGFI-M3
Jonathan Rhodes, MSPT, MBA, DPT

This is a downloadable course only. You will not be mailed a printed copy. Follow download instructions on your receipt.

   

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Medical Considerations for the Youth Athlete

Medical Considerations for the Youth Athlete

This is a text-based self-study course containing 6 chapters of content:

  • Chapter 1 - Performance Enhancement Training for the Adolescent Athlete
  • Chapter 2 - Common Musculoskeletal Injuries and Rehabilitation Concerns in Youth Athlete
  • Chapter 3 - Overuse Injuries in Pediatric Athletics
  • Chapter 4 - Burnout and Injury Recovery in Sports
  • Chapter 5 - Nutrition Considerations for Youth and Adolescent Athletes
  • Chapter 6 - Providing Appropriate Medical Care in Secondary School Athletics: The TEAM Approach

Editors:

Gail “Cookie” Freidhoff-Bohman, PT, ATC-Ret

Mark DeCarlo, PT, DPT, MHA, SCS, ATC

Authors:

Robert A. Panariello MS, PT, ATC, CSCS

Timothy J. Stump MS, PT, CSCS

Dean Maddalone pTA, CSCS, USAW

Ryan McDivitt, PT, DPT, SCS, ATC

Thurman V. Alvey, III, DO, FAOASM

Aaron M. Hudnall, OMS4

Daniel Schmidt, PTR

Michele Macedonio, MS, RDN, CSSD, LD

Angelo Marsella, MA, ATC, USAW


0.7 CEUs (7 contact hours/CCUs)


APTA courses are accepted in all states plus the District of Columbia, as allowed by the type of course requirements in state regulations. A small number of states require APTA to seek pre-approval of courses. The approval codes for these states are below.
CPTA approval number: CPTA2016-17
Texas Physical Therapy Association: 1909019TX


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Pediatric and Adolescent Sports Medicine: Management and Prevention of Injuries in the Young Athlete

Pediatric and Adolescent Sports Medicine: Management and Prevention of Injuries in the Young Athlete

Pediatric and Adolescent Sports Medicine: Management and Prevention of Injuries Unique to the Young Athlete

Editors: Donna L. Merkel, PT, MS, SCS, CSCS and Joe Molony, PT, MS, SCS, CSCS

Earn 30 CEUs upon successful completion.

Chapter 1: Medical Conditions Which Impact Youth Athletic Rehabilitation
Kimberly Cover, MS, RD, CSSD, LDN
Matthew Grady, MD
Julie Linton, MD
Donna L. Merkel PT, MS, SCS, CSCS
Danny Smith, PT, DHSC, SCS, OCS, ATC

Chapter 2: Growth and Development
Cindy Miles, PT, MEd, PCS
Donna L. Merkel, PT, MS, SCS, CSCS

Chapter 3: The Management of Lower Extremity Injury Unique to the Young Athlete
Mark V. Paterno, PT, PhD, SCS, ATC
Alyson Filipa, PT, DPT, CSCS
Laura C. Schmitt, PT, PhD
Jeffery Taylor-Haas, PT, OCS, CSCS

Chapter 4: Upper Extremity: Differential Diagnosis, Surgical Considerations and Rehabilitation
Jeff Albaugh, PT, MS, ATC
Brian Eckenrode, PT, DPT, MS, OCS
Theodore Ganley, MD

Chapter 5: The Management of Spinal Conditions in the Young Athlete
Kevin McHorse, PT, SCS, Cert. MDT
Lauren Whitehouse, PT, MSPT
Michelle Prince, MD

Chapter 6: Strength and Conditioning for the Young Athlete: Guidelines and Safety Considerations
Gregory D. Myer, MS, CSCS
Avery D. Faigenbaum, EdD, CSCS
Timothy E. Hewett, PhD, FACSM

      

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Rehabilitation of Articular Cartilage Injuries of the Knee

Rehabilitation of Articular Cartilage Injuries of the Knee

REHABILITATION OF ARTICULAR CARTILAGE INJURIES OF THE KNEE

Editor: Timothy Tyler, PT,  MS, ATC

Earn 30 CEUs upon successful completion of the course.

Chapter 1: Articular Cartilage: Anatomical and Physiological Considerations in Healing

Chapter 2: Evidence Based Non-Operative Rehabilitation of Chondral Lesions

Chapter 3: Treatment and Outcomes Utilizing Microfracture

Chapter 4: Osteochondral Autograft Transplantation of the Knee: Surgical and Rehabilitation Considerations

Chapter 5: Meniscal Surgery and Rehabilitation

Chapter 6: Rehabilitation after Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (ACI)


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Rehabilitation of the Aging Athlete

Rehabilitation of the Aging Athlete

REHABILITATION OF THE AGING ATHLETE

Editor: J. W. Matheson, PT

Earn 21 CEUs upon successful completion of this course.

Course Description:
This course will examine the physiological and treatment specific changes that are considered when working with the aging athlete. Each monograph will highlight how this special population requires additional knowledge and skill when being evaluated and treated by the practicing sports clinician.


Objectives:
Recognize the physiological consequences of aging
Understand the effects of strength and endurance training on the aging athlete
Understand the best practice techniques for rehabilitation of common shoulder and elbow conditions in the aged athlete
Recognize the current rehabilitation techniques and non-operative treatments for knee osteoarthritis
Understand the difference between tendonitis and tendinosis
Recognize the current rehabilitation guidelines for operative and non-operative treatment of Achilles tendonopathies and plantar fasciopathies.
Understand the risks and current recommendations on sports activity following total joint replacement.

Chapter 1: Physiological Changes Accompanying the Aging Process

Chapter 2: Rehabilitation of Common Shoulder and Elbow Discorders in the Aging Athlete

Chapter 3: Evidence Based Evaluation and Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis in the Aging Athlete

Chapter 4: Achilles Tendinopathy and Plantar Fasiopathy in the Aging Athlete

Chapter 5: Balance Training in the Aging Athlete

Chapter 6: Sports Activity Following Total Joint Arthroplasty

 

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Rehabilitation of the Hip

Rehabilitation of the Hip

REHABILITATION OF THE HIP

Editors: Lori Bolgla, PT, PhD, ATC and J. Craig Garrison, PT, PhD, SCS, ATC

Earn 30 CEUs upon successful completion of the course.

Chapter 1: Hip Anatomy, Biomechanics and Assessment

Chapter 2: The Pediatric Hip

Chapter 3: A Biomechanical Perspective for the Influence of the Hip on Lower Extremity Pathology

Chapter 4: Extra-articular Hip Pathologies

Chapter 5: Surgical Management and Rehabilitation for Labral Pathology in the Hip

Chapter 6: Total Hip Arthroplasty


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Running Course

Running Course

Running Course

Bryan Heiderscheit, PT, PhD
Mitchell J. Rauh, PT, PhD, MPH, FACSM
Earn 40 CEUs upon successful completion.

Chapter 1:
Epidemiology of Running Injuries
Mitchell J. Rauh, PT, PhD, MPH, FACSM

Chapter 2: Running Mechanics and Clinical Analysis
Bryan Heiderscheit, PT, PhD

Chapter 3: Evaluation and Management of Lumbopelvic, Hip and Knee Running-Related Injuries
Bryan Heiderscheit, PT, PhD
Shane McClinton, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT, CSCS
Evan Nelson, PT, DPT, OCS
 
Chapter 4:
Foot, Ankle and Lower Leg Injuries in Runners
D. S. Blaise Williams III, MPT, PhD

Chapter 5: Footwear and Foot Orthoses
Michael Ryan, PhD, CPed(C)

Chapter 6: The Female Runner
Kari Brown, PT, DPT, SCS

Chapter 7: Nutrition for the Runner
Michelle T. Barrack, PhD, RD

Chapter 8: Return to Running
Kari Brown, PT, DPT, SCS


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The Female Athlete: 2014

The Female Athlete: 2014

The Female Athlete: 2014
Editor: Teresa L Schuemann DPT, SCS, ATC, CSCS

Earn 30 CEUs upon successful completion.

The female athlete presents a unique set of structural, physiological, and hormonal differences from the male athlete. These differences are important for the physical therapist to be aware of when treating the female athlete.

From pre-participation, to common injuries, to the female athlete triad and acute medical conditions, this course covers the spectrum of considerations needed for appropriate treatment of women in sports. Enhance your practice today with this up to date course from leading sports physical therapy clinicians and educators.  

Chapter 1: Pre-participation Screening for the Female Athlete
Barbara Sanders, PhD, PT, SCS, FAPT
Brenda Boucher, PhD, PT, OCS, CHT, FAAOMPT

Chapter 2: Medical Considerations for the Female Athlete
Teresa L Schuemann DPT, SCS, ATC, CSCS

Chapter 3: Prevention of Lower Extremity Injury in the Female Athlete
Lori A Bolgla, PT, PhD, MAcc, ATC

Chapter 4: Management of Lower Extremity Dysfunction in the Female Athlete
Janice Loudon PT, PhD, ATC, SCS

Chapter 5: Management of Upper Extremity Dysfunction in the Female Athlete
Marisa Pontillo PT, DPT, SCS

Chapter 6: The Spine in Sport: Considerations for the Female Athlete
Barb Hoogenboom, PT, EdD, SCS, ATC


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The Female Triathlete

The Female Triathlete

Triathlon is a growing sport. As a multidimensional sport, triathletes need to be proficient in swimming, cycling, and running to be successful and injury free. As the sport grows, so does the participation of female athletes and the number of competitions. This growth requires an increased number of qualified sports medicine team members to provide appropriate and efficient care along the management continuum and across the life span of the triathlete.

This home study course will cover from injury prevention to acute injury management through rehabilitation and performance enhancement for female triathletes. It will provide management strategies across the life span from adolescence through the master female triathlete including pregnant, post-partum and physically challenged triathletes. Triathlon training and competition offers a unique set of challenges for injury and illness management of its participants and for treating sports clinicians with the three components of this sport. This course’s aim is to equip each physical therapist with the tools to address the needs of these female athletes during participation in this sport throughout the athlete’s life span.

Non- APTA Member: $500

APTA Member: $300

AASPT Member: $270

Earn 11 CEUs


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The Knee: Adolescence through the Active Adult

The Knee: Adolescence through the Active Adult

Earn 25 CEUs upon successful completion

Chapter 1
An Evidence-Based Approach for the Management of Patellar Tendinopathy
Kathleen J. Pantano, PT, PhD

Chapter 2
Pediatric Knee Injuries
Laura C. Schmitt, PT, PhD
Mark V. Paterno, PT, PhD

Chapter 3
An Update on Risk Factors and Management of Patellofemoral Pain
John D. Willson, PhD, PT
Richard W. Willy, PhD, PT, OCS

Chapter 4
Iliotibial Band Syndrome
Nicholas Hagen, PT, DPT, SCS, CSCS

Chapter 5
Management of an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury in the Skeletally Immature Athlete
Mark Paterno, PT, PhD, MBA, SCS, ATC
Alyson Filipa, PT, DPT, SCS, CSCS
Laura C. Schmitt PT, PhD

    

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The Spine in Sports

The Spine in Sports

THE SPINE IN SPORTS
Editor: Barb Hoogenboom PT, EdD, SCS, ATC

Earn 30 CEUs upon successful completion of the course.

Chapter 1: The Anatomy and Biomechanics of the Lumbar Spine

Chapter 2: Spondylolisthesis and Spondylolysis

Chapter 3: The McKenzie Approach to RX

Chapter 4: Examination, Evaluation, and Interventions for Core Stabilization

Chapter 5: Post-operative Management of Microdiscectomy

Chapter 6: Pilates and other Complementary Therapies for Rehabilitation of the Low Back


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